NEWS OCTOBER 2008

Thursday October 30

[LIVE REVIEW] "GET OUT AND VOTE" - YOUNGSTOWN, OH - OCTOBER 29 - #2

ROCKIN' THE VOTE
By David Skolnick
Youngstown Vindicator (www.vindy.com/)

Chevy event blends music and politics

About 3,500 to 4,000 attended the Get Out and Vote ’08 concert.

YOUNGSTOWN — The musicians’ message was both straightforward and subtle.

The performers at Wednesday’s Get Out and Vote ’08 concert urged the 3,500 to 4,000 people at the Chevrolet Centre to, well, get out and vote — for change.

The subtle part was: vote for Barack Obama, the Democratic presidential nominee, whose campaign slogan is “Change we can believe in.”

“You know that word ‘change,’ how it’s been thrown around a lot,” said musician Sheryl Crow. “I like the idea. How about you?”

But it was almost like preaching to the choir.

There were many concertgoers wearing Obama shirts, buttons and hats. Only a handful were spotted wearing Republican John McCain gear at the show.

Musician Norah Jones — who like the other performers at the concert has expressed support for Obama — playfully sang, “I can’t tell you who to vote for. I signed a contract” as she prepared for a song.

She later added: “You know in your heart who to vote for,” and, “I hope next Tuesday I’ll be happy.”

Among the songs Jones sang Wednesday was “My Dear Country,” which she said was written about the 2004 election that saw President Bush, a Republican, beat Democrat John Kerry.

“‘Cause we believed in our candidate, but even more it’s the one we hate, I need someone I could shake, on Election Day. But the day after is darker, and deeper and deeper we go, who knows, maybe it’s all a dream, who knows if I’ll wake up and scream.”

Also performing Wednesday were the Beastie Boys, who organized the Get Out and Vote ’08 concert series; Ben Harper and Perry Farrell’s Satellite Party. Farrell is the former frontman for Jane’s Addiction.

The concert was billed as a way to encourage people to vote.

But it was hard to overlook the musicians’ comments.

“We’re going to win in Ohio,” said Farrell during an ear-splitting 30-minute set. “Can anything stop us?”

As he left the stage, Farrell added: “Let’s take the country back. We can do it. No one can stop us.”

Several of Crow’s songs were political or she made a comment before singing to make them political.

She started with “God Bless This Mess,” and also played “Gasoline,” “Every Day is a Winding Road,” “A Change Would Do You Good” and a solid remake of Stevie Wonder’s classic “Higher Ground.”

The Youngstown concert was the third of six stops for Get Out and Vote ’08. The six-city tour that started Monday in Charlotte, N.C., goes to Dayton today and finishes in Milwaukee on Sunday, two days before the election.

Traveling with the tour are representatives of Rock the Vote, an organization that encourages young people to vote.

Members of the group distributed fliers to those at the concert that compared the positions of Obama and McCain.

The information seems a bit skewed in favor of Obama on some issues.

For example, on the Iraq war, the flier reads: “McCain led Senate efforts to authorize the Iraq war in 2002; to date, 4,179 Americans have been killed and more than 30,000 wounded in Iraq.”

For the Democrat, it reads: “Obama opposed the authorization of the Iraq war in 2002.” Obama wasn’t a U.S. senator and didn’t vote on the bill at the time.

The Beastie Boys, Crow and actor Ben Stiller appeared earlier Wednesday at Youngstown State University.

Stiller and the Beastie Boys spoke briefly about why voting is necessary to the college generation.

Crow performed a few songs and discussed why voting is essential.

“If you go down to the polling places and the lines are long, it’s worth the wait,” Crow told the crowd. “I believe everybody’s voice should be heard.”

The brief appearances frustrated some students who expected more of a show. But the point of the appearance was to increase awareness of voting.

“We have this generation — the Millenials — who represent a huge population of the electorate, but they don’t talk about our issues,” said Kim Rogers, political director of the national Rock the Vote office. “They talk about things that affect our parents, they talk about things that affect our grandparents ... so we’re trying to change the narrative.”

Students attended the rally for both the entertainers and the meaning behind it.

“The next four years are going to be pretty important in our lives ... and who our president is is going to make a lot of difference in our jobs and our economic situation,” said Mike Ringler, a YSU freshman.

skolnick@vindy.com

XContributor: Jon Moffett, staff writer

Source: Youngstown Vindicator (www.vindy.com/)


[PICS] "GET OUT AND VOTE" - YOUNGSTOWN, OH - OCTOBER 29


Mike Diamond of the Beastie Boys and Sheryl talk to the crowd during the Get Out and Vote ’08 tour stop Wednesday at the Chevrolet Centre in Youngstown. Special to the Tribune Chronicle / Bob Jadloski (www.tribtoday.com)

Wednesday October 29

[LIVE REVIEW] "GET OUT AND VOTE" - YOUNGSTOWN, OH - OCTOBER 29

Get Out the Vote '08 Tour by Dan Martin

It's part rally, part rock concert when the Rock the Vote Road Trip rolls into town. And they've brought a few friends with them to YSU to help get out the vote: musicians Sheryl Crow and the Beastie Boys with surprise guest, actor Ben Stiller.

"You guys are in a state that is definitely in play and it makes a huge difference, and the fact that you guys are all here and energized to do something about what's going on in our country is amazing and so please get out there and vote", says Ben Stiller.

"This election really really matters to all of us so, if you're registered, you gotta vote, you got to", says Ad Rock of Beastie Boys.

Rock the Vote has been on the road for forty seven days, signing up more than two point five million new and first time voters. But now that registration deadlines have come and gone, their mission is simple. To get these new voters to the polls on or before Election Day.

"To overcome whatever apathy they may feel, or whatever disenfranchisement they may feel with the system, and actually get out and make their voice heard", says Nick Brown, Rock the Vote blogger and photographer.

"Having artists come in and do something important can definitely get kids to want to get involved, get out, vote, do their part and change history", says YSU Senior Cali Hartman.

"This generation is going to have a huge impact on the results of this election, and I think that if all of us did vote, that's true, it would happen, we would have a huge impact on it", says YSU freshman Domenico Lombardi.

People and polls say these types of rallies tend to favor Barack Obama over John McCain, but Rock the Vote says it doesn't care WHO you vote for, as long as you rock it.

"Depending on the state, depending on the district some of the polling tends to favor the democrats, quite frankly we just want to get those young people out to the polls so that their voices can be heard", says Brown.

As the crowd danced and sang along with Sheryl Crow: "I think a change will do you good."


Photo: Chris Hudson

Source: www.wkbn.com


[PICS] "GET OUT AND VOTE" - RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 28


Sheryl Crow overcame mook-ish shouts of "Take it off!" to deliver a stirring set
at the Richmond, Virginia stop on the Get Out and Vote Tour.
Photograph by Mike Lynaugh for RollingStone.Com


Sheryl Crow performs "Gasoline" in Richmond, Virginia as part of the Get Out the
Vote Tour. Photograph by Mike Lynaugh for RollingStone.Com


[SET LIST] "GET OUT AND VOTE" - RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 28

GOD BLESS
BABYLON
CHANGE
CAN'T CRY
GASOLINE
HAPPY
OUT OF OUR HEADS
WINDING ROAD
HIGHER GROUND  with Jack Johnson, Norah Jones and Santagold


[LIVE REVIEW] "GET OUT AND VOTE" - RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 28

REVIEW: Beasties, Crow in "Get Out and Vote" tour at Coliseum

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2008 - 12:25 AM Updated: 03:52 AM

With exactly a week until voters hit the polls, a lineup of musical acts led by the Beastie Boys is trying to enforce the significance of one thing: Don't forget to vote.

At the Richmond Coliseum Tuesday night, almost 6,000 people crammed the general admission floor area and the side stands for a four-hour-plus concert headlined by the Beasties, but also starring such heavyweights as Sheryl Crow, Jack Johnson, Norah Jones and newcomer Santogold.

The six-date tour of swing states, dubbed "Get Out and Vote'08," launched Monday night in Charlotte, N.C.

Though much of the crowd, which leaned heavily toward 20and 30-somethings, was clearly biding its time until Michael "Mike D" Diamond, Adam "MCA" Yauch, and Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz hit the stage -- which they did a little after 10 p.m. -- loving welcomes were also directed at Crow and Johnson.

Between sets, which were disassembled fairly quickly, a video screen hanging behind the empty stage squawked messages from Republicans and Democrats, celebrities such as Anne Hathaway and everyday folks, imploring the audience to exercise their right to vote next week.

Of the performers, Crow was the most politically vocal, pronouncing from the stage, "I have to believe that we have enough strength to change the course of our nation. I have to believe that war never solved a [darn] thing. We're going to be aware. Aware. Aware."

The Beasties addressed the political nature of the show more subtly, with Yauch telling the crowd after a blistering opening of "Ill Communication" to remember the 2004 election and how the millions of registered voters who didn't hit the polls possibly affected the outcome.

Though members of the New York trio have all passed the 40-year-old mark, age hasn't quashed their spirit. Bounding around the open stage like puppies, Diamond, Yauch and Horovitz nimbly traded the rhymes of "Posse in Effect," "Body Movin,' " "Root Down" and the requisite singalong of "No Sleep Till Brooklyn" with youthful fervor.

Mix Master Mike, meanwhile, held court on the turntables just as an old-school DJ should. Prior to the band's arrival on stage, he shuffled a tight mix of Rush's "Tom Sawyer" and, during the group's set, kept the backbeat rolling effortlessly.

As for other performances:

Crow opened her 40-minute set solo, with an acoustic guitar, for the new "God Bless This Mess." But she immediately switched to bass when her three-piece band joined her for the environmentally pointed "Shine Over Babylon."

Her time on stage didn't shirk the hits, either. "A Change (Will Do You Good)" and the pensive "If It Makes You Happy" soared, while "Can't Cry Anymore" included a pleasant dip into Johnny Nash's "I Can See Clearly Now."

Johnson, Jones and Santogold -- who had all performed by that point -- trotted back onstage to join Crow for a messy, if well-intentioned, take on Stevie Wonder's "Higher Ground."

Johnson, the lackadaisical surfer dude, noted that he had just arrived from Hawaii and, not realizing the chilly temperatures in Virginia, had to borrow a friend's pair of shoes. For those unfamiliar with Johnson, it's usually flip-flops or bare feet for the unassuming singer/guitarist, who strummed his acoustic guitar for the breezy "Banana Pancakes" and clip-clopping "Plastic Jesus/Fall Line."

Though his easygoing demeanor seemed at odds with the intense undercurrent of this tour, Johnson was an obvious favorite among many in this crowd, who sang along fervently with "Sleep Through the Static."

Jones, best known for her Grammy sweeping "Don't Know Why," not only didn't sing that song, but was almost unrecognizable when she came onstage with short blond-ish hair and strapped on a guitar, rather than sitting behind a piano.

But, as soon as she opened her mouth and those potent vocals behind "Come Away With Me" echoed through the Coliseum, there was no doubt who was behind the mic.

Jones performed with two other female musicians and did slink behind the piano for "My Dear Country," a song she said she wrote almost four years ago to the day after the last election.

"The election is going to be very exciting," she said. "I think we're all going to need a weeklong nap afterward." Contact Melissa Ruggieri at (804) 649-6120 or mruggieri@timesdispatch.com

  • SLIDESHOW: Rally in Monroe Park

    Source: Richmond Times-Dispatch (www.inrich.com)


  • [VIDEOS] ROCK THE VOTE - SHERYL IN RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 28

     

    Sheryl Crow Revs Up Obama Canvassers

    In Town On Rock The Vote Tour; Gives Pep Talk To Obama Canvassers At West Marshall Street Headquarters
    By 1140wrva.com
    Tuesday, October 28, 2008

    Richmond, VA (1140wrva.com) - Musician Sheryl Crow, in town for a Rock The Vote and Barack Obama campaign concerts, visited Obama's West Marshall Street canvassing headquarters Tuesday to pep the volunteers. Crow said "the eyes of America are watching this state, because this state will dictate in many ways what the future of this nation will look like". She says voting has always been a necessity for her, and she's never been cynical. But this year she senses an urgency with an "opportunity to change the course of this nation".

    Crow notes her dad has been a life-long Republican, and that when she turned 18 her mom and dad would secretly politick their four kids knowing they would cancel each other's votes out. She says now her dad has been working in an Obama campaign office 24-7. She followed her short talk with an autograph and photo session with dozens of onlookers.

    Meeting with reporters after the campaign talk, she stressed that her "Rock The Vote" concert is separate from her personal campaigning. She says the concert effort is not to just get people to register, but to go to the polls on Election Day. She says she thinks many people get intimidated by the lines, the process, the issues in the booklet, and the Presidential race. Crow notes the last two elections were very close, and expects this one to be also in a crucial battleground state like Virginia.

    Source: WRVA Newsradio (http://www.wrva.com)

    Tuesday October 28

    [INTERVIEW] ELECTRIC 102.7 - BY NICK SCOTT, THE POLITICAL DJ

    October 28, 2008 - Electric 102.7 FM radio

    MP3 - 10 mb - 10:02


    [PICS] "ROCK THE VOTE" RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 28



    Pictures by barackobamadotcom


    Picture by Rock the Vote 2008


    Picture by Rock the Vote 2008


    Picture by Rock the Vote 2008


    [PICS] "GET OUT AND VOTE" CHARLOTTE, NC - OCTOBER 27

     

    [ GO TO PHOTO GALLERY ]

    15 PHOTOS

    Pictures by FLC

    "Sheryl Crow played a good set. My only complaint is that she played a fair number of songs off her new album, so, therefore, I didn’t know them. I pondered on whether or not there was a hidden agenda when she sang, ” A Change Will Do You Good.”" (http://projectcodename.wordpress.com)

    "..Sheryl Crow was also touring with them during the Rock the Vote so i was able to get her on two things as well. Even though it was so cold she stopped and signed for us all and even took photos with some people.." (http://blog.autographfan.com/)


    [SET LIST] "GET OUT AND VOTE" CHARLOTTE, NC - OCTOBER 27

    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    CAN'T CRY
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    WINDING ROAD


    [LIVE REVIEW] "GET OUT AND VOTE" CHARLOTTE, NC - OCTOBER 27

    Get Out and Vote with Beastie Boys

    By Courtney Devores
    Posted: Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008

    Music fans can thank presidential candidates John McCain and Barack Obama and North Carolina's still-undecided voters for the Beastie Boys' and Sheryl Crow's “Get Out And Vote” concert Monday night at Amos' Southend.

    It was the Beastie Boys first Charlotte show since Lollapalooza 1994. The group's members waved to fans standing in line next to the artists' buses as MTV's Rock the Vote volunteers passed out voting materials to the crowd. Although the tour isn't affiliated with either party, posters and pamphlets outside gave it a decidedly Obama slant. While all of the artists – including opening act Santogold – encouraged the audience to vote, Adam Yauch was the only one to mention George W. Bush and Obama by name.

    Fans truly came for the music though and the artists delivered. Santogold performed a half-hour set that mixed dancehall, hip-hop and Missing Persons-style `80s new wave in a fresh way and veered from the arrangements of tracks like “You'll Find a Way” and “Starstruck” from her 2008 self-titled debut.

    Fans truly came for the music though and the artists delivered. Santogold performed a half-hour set that mixed dancehall, hip-hop and Missing Persons-style `80s new wave in a fresh way and veered from the arrangements of tracks like “You'll Find a Way” and “Starstruck” from her 2008 self-titled debut.

    Crow played second, starting her 40-minute set with the acoustic “God Bless This Mess,” which opens her latest album “Detours.” Her three-piece band joined her for more “Detours” tracks, “Shine Over Babylon” and “Love Is Free.” Surprisingly there were no cries of “Gasoline will be free” from her latest single, although she did tailor her set with a balance of material that fit the election (“A Change Would Do You Good,” “Can't Cry Anymore,” and another new one, “Out Of Our Heads”) with some of her hits. “If It Makes You Happy” received the most applause, although the crowd, especially toward the back of the room, was probably the chattiest Crow's played for in years. She quoted Robert Kennedy and the Dalai Lama, but kept her politics within her songs for the most part, ending the set with “Everyday is a Winding Road.” She and Santogold introduced the Beastie Boys (as the Beasties had done for both of them earlier) and the loose, spontaneous feel of the night continued.

    DJ Mix Master Mike gave the Beasties a long intro spinning through spurts of records to get the crowd hyped. Dressed just as they were when fans saw them in the parking lot earlier in the day – Mike Diamond (Mike D.) in a scholarly sweater and tie, Yauch in a hoodie, and Adam Horowitz in a plaid shirt, jeans, and ball cap – the Beasties began their set with “Super Disco Breakin'” (from 1998's “Hello Nasty”).

    Throughout an hour-long set they fired off “Ch-Check It Out,” “Body Moving,” “Three MC's and One DJ,” “Root Down,” and “Right Right Now Now.” But it was “Sure Shot” (from 1994's “Ill Communication”) that got the crowd jumping and joining in on the lyrics. “Pass the Mic” saw the ever-so-cool Yauch, who was often less animated than the boyish Horowitz or the boisterous Diamond, moving more about the stage.

    The three-song finale of “No Sleep Till Brooklyn,” “So What'Cha Want” and “Intergalactic” found fans dancing so hard that the floor of Amos' balcony shook. The Beasties left the audience chanting their name, but didn't satisfy them with an encore after a 15-song set that amply covered their career. Most of the crowd remained until the house lights flooded the room.

    Given the 14 years since their last appearance the Beastie Boys probably could have played anything and the rapt audience would have cheered. Instead they were left satisfied, but wanting more still.

    Source: Charlotte Observer (www.charlotteobserver.com)

    Monday October 27

    [TV] NOVEMBER 6TH - RACHEL RAY SHOW

    Make sure to catch Sheryl Crow’s interview segment with Gabby Reese on the Rachel Ray show on November 6th. The Rachel Ray show airs in Los Angeles on CBS at 9am and in New York City on ABC at 10am

    www.rachaelrayshow.com

    Source: Interscope


    [CD REVIEW] HOME FOR CHRISTMAS - SKOPEMAG.COM

    I have to admit that I haven’t been excited about new Christmas offerings (especially in September), after previously hearing everything from James Brown to Johnny Mathis, to Nat King Cole, to Bob Rivers, and to quote Quint (Robert Shaw) from Jaws, “And everything in between!”  Note: I have to admit though, that the past two seasons, Hall & Oates release and re-release was great and didn’t disappoint. 

    First, I wondered what Go Tell It On The Mountain was doing on here.  I guess I never paid attention to the lyrics being of seasonal spiritual significance.  She gets a pass on this one.  The Christmas Song has a progressive jazz type beat, okay for use by a female singer, competing against the realms of traditionally dominant male smoky throated vocalists like Mel Torme and Nat King Cole that came before. The disc is laden with 20’s-40’s movie-like big band/jazz soundstage backdrops.  White Christmas and I’ll Be Home For Christmas get the full Roaring 20’s Speakeasy club torch-singer treatment.  Merry Christmas Baby has a real Tyrone Davis funky feel, which kind of translates to a way Southside Johnny or Springsteen (and the Big Man in a red suit with a sax) would treat it.  Blue Christmas also has the Asbury Park vibe going on. 

    To tell you the truth, I expected a country styled presentation of the songs, instead of the laid back Rita Haworth “Gilda” inspired treatment (Her pic on the cover sleeve even has a similar black sleek dress).  The disc is a good easy listening, watching the logs in the fireplace compliment.  Sheryl of course, does a good job with everything she works on, this being no exception.  I was pleased to listen to the same traditional songs done in this fashion. 

    Words By: RME

    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Source: Skope Magazine (http://skopemag.com)

    Friday October 24

    [POSTER] OCTOBER 18, 2008


    [PIC] SHERYL PROVES SHE'S GOT BALLS!

    What a sweet, little rock'n'roller!

    Thanks Sheryl, but we already knew it!

    Wednesday October 22

    [LIVE REVIEW] ARIZONA STATE FAIR - OCTOBER 21

    Fair crowd warms up to Sheryl Crow

    Special to the Republic

    As the blinking lights of the Arizona State Fair midway sparkled and the muffled sound of delighted screams filled the air, a long line streamed into the Veterans Memorial Coliseum to see Sheryl Crow take the stage. The adult-alternative superstar made her second State Fair appearance Tuesday night before a huge crowd, though it took a little while for things to get going strong.

    The crowd let out a roar when the house lights fell. Suddenly, the house music stopped and Crow appeared onstage with her acoustic guitar singing God Bless This Mess. Her sudden arrival seemed to catch everyone off guard. Even the spotlight took a second to find her.

    But Crow was is fine form, her now completely recognizable voice filling the arena as she sang her melancholy tale. While this slow burner may not have kicked things off in high gear, the presence of her skillful eight-piece band on her second tune Shine Over Babylon gave the rest of the show a rowdier feel.

    Still, the crowd was making Crow work a little. Most of the audience stayed seated for the first couple of songs and the energy was pretty low for the start of the show. But Crow started to get people loosened by the time her recent single Love is Free rolled around. By the end of this jangly sing-a-long, she had the crowd clapping and swaying along with the lazy beat.

    It's not surprising that her biggest hits were the ones that had the crowd on its feet and when the slick guitar riff for A Change Would Do You Good blared out of the huge speakers, the audience was up and singing. Even the more down-tempo singles like Strong Enough resulted in chanted choruses and cheers.

    Despite the growing enthusiasm from the crowd, Crow seemed a little uneasy onstage, which was surprising for such a veteran performer. She hardly smiled and her eyes seemed to be constantly scanning the crowd, almost as if she were nervous

    This resulted in the show felling a little rigid for the first half hour, but as the night wore on, the whole feel of the performance seemed to lighten, which suited Crow's laid-back tunes very well. Her band sounded extremely tight, and the members played with the relaxed nature of a group that has played together for a long time and really knows how to play their instruments. After the initial weirdness, Crow could be seen dancing around the stage and sharing mikes with her cheerful band mates.

    "It's Tuesday night, isn't it?" Crow laughed as she pranced around the stage. "Tuesday night is my big dancing night."

    Between strong versions of some of her biggest hits, including My Favorite Mistake and If It Makes You Happy, Crow and company broke the songs down into improvised jams featuring blistering guitar solos by lead guitarist Peter Stroud. On occasion Crow mixed things up by adding in lines from other songs like the Rolling Stones' Gimme Shelter and Johnny Nash's I Can See Clearly Now. While these digressions were obviously well rehearsed, they nevertheless gave the show a feeling of spontaneity, something that is generally missing from big arena shows.

    Crow now seemed relaxed and casual, asking the audience if anyone had brought a prize-winning pig to the fair and talking about how much gas prices suck before bursting into one of her latest songs Gasoline, which paints an apocalyptic vision of the future where gas is free. Crow talked a lot to the audience and seemed very sincere and personable before such a huge crowd when she talked about the inspiration for her song Detours.

    "Life sure does change, doesn't it? I was engaged and we broke up. Then I had breast cancer and then I was cured of cancer. Then I adopted a beautiful baby boy and we live on a farm now," Crow said as the crowd cheered widely. "So, no matter how much you think you have life figured out, it's the detours along the way that make you see who you really are."

    After that serious note, the concert was is full swing with Crow getting the whole place standing and dancing for tunes like Soak Up the Sun, Everyday is a Winding Road and an encore of All I Wanna Do and Stevie Wonder's Higher Ground.

    By the end of the show, the floor of the Coliseum was a sea of dancing people struggling to get closer to the stage, while Crow and her band seemed to be having a great time playing together. Crow had clearly won the crowd over by the time she locked arm in arm with her cohorts for a group bow, and her beaming smile as she skipped off stage made it seem like that really meant something to her.

    Source: azcentral.com

    Tuesday October 21

    [VIDEO] "DRUNK WITH THE THOUGHT OF YOU" & "ALL I WANNA DO" - MONTREUX JAZZ FEST 2008 (HD720)

    Montreux Jazz Festival
    Montreux, Switzerland
    July 5, 2008

    Sunday October 19

    [LIVE REVIEW] BENEFIT CONCERT AT VCU, RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 18

    Crow works -- and the crowd finally responds
    A benefit concert at VCU is stuffed with 90 minutes of hits

    Sunday, Oct 19, 2008 - 12:08 AM Updated: 02:31 AM

    By MELISSA RUGGIERI
    TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER
    Picture: Alexa Welch Edlund / Times-Dispatch

    Sheryl Crow didn't have to work as hard as she did to rouse her audience.

    But there she was, bounding off the stage during her version of "The First Cut Is the Deepest" to sit on laps, pass the mike to kids to sing a verse and trot over to a spirited young group of fans who had her attention all show.

    Being that last night's concert at the Siegel Center at Virginia Commonwealth University was a benefit for the Genworth Children's Advantage Classic, the audience of about 3,000 was likely composed of folks who don't attend many rock concerts.

    And, since the crowd setup was typical donor-dinner style -- about 50 tables covered the floor of the venue -- it must have been odd for Crow to look out from the stage and see what looked a bit like the audience from the Golden Globe Awards.

    But Crow, 46, exerted herself to charm the initially politely clapping crowd by constantly beaming, joking and presenting a 90-minute hits-stuffed concert that sounded pristine and was often tremendous fun.

    Backed by her tight six-piece band and two backup singers, Crow dove into the woozy, percussion-rich "Leaving Las Vegas" and the new "Love Is Free," a playful skip of a song, with smiles that were rueful and joyous, respectively.

    She also unveiled another track from her current "Detours" album, the humorous foot-stomper "Motivation," about the glut of celebrities who are famous for no reason.

    At one point, Crow acknowledged her reason for being at the Genworth fundraiser, telling the audience, "Every kid needs a mentor and someone who says, 'I believe in you.'"

    Proceeds from the show will benefit various charities that assist disadvantaged children.

    Crow also extended praise to Andre Agassi and his wife, Stefanie Graf, ambassadors to the Genworth cause, who appeared before the concert to thank the attendees.

    "I believe there are angels who walk the Earth, and [they] are two of them," Crow said.

    After gliding through a muscular take on "My Favorite Mistake," and "If It Makes You Happy," Crow, who looked tan and healthy in her casually cool jeans and vest, told the audience it was time for them to dance.

    And they did, finally rising to throw their hands in the air, wave the blue glowsticks that were passed around mid-set and sing along to the bubbly "Soak Up the Sun" and "Everyday Is a Winding Road."

    It may have taken some gentle prodding, but it appeared that by show's end, it was impossible for anyone in the crowd to resist Crow's musical allure.

    Contact Melissa Ruggieri at (804) 649-6120 or mruggieri@timesdispatch.com

    Source: Richmond Times-Dispatch (www.inrich.com/cva/ric/home.html)

    Thursday October 16

    [PICS] 2008 SPIRIT OF LIFE AWARD DINNER - ARRIVALS

    Sheryl arrives at the 2008 Spirit Of Life Award Dinner on October 15, 2008 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/WireImage)


    [NEWS] SHERYL CROW BRINGS A MESSAGE WITH HER MUSIC

    Making music (and a clothing line)while making a difference in the world

    Thursday, Oct 16, 2008 - 12:06 AM

    BY MELISSA RUGGIERI
    TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER

    Sheryl Crow has never concealed her passions.

    Her latest release, "Detours," features several songs that challenge the current administration, and the album's centerpiece, "Shine Over Babylon," is a tune that Crow has called an "apocalyptic diatribe."

    Last year, her devotion to environmental causes led to a much-publicized verbal tussle with Republican political strategist Karl Rove at the White House Correspondents' Association dinner.

    In April, she publicly endorsed Barack Obama, and on Monday, she appeared on CNN's "Larry King Live" to debate the upcoming presidential election with actor Dean Cain, a John McCain supporter.

    Crow has even contributed a blog post to King's forum (http://larrykinglive.blogs.cnn.com/), and later this month, she will perform at four of the six dates of the Get Out and Vote'08 tour, which stops at the Richmond Coliseum on Oct. 28 and also features the Beastie Boys, Norah Jones and Jack Johnson.

    What she hopes to convey on that tour, she says, is the importance of participating in the political system.

    "To me, it's not about listening to all of the rhetoric, but voting strong-mindedly about this country," she said Monday morning from her home in Los Angeles.

    Though she's quietly worked with the Obama campaign by visiting potential voters in Tennessee and her native Missouri, Crow is excited about being involved in something as public as the Vote tour.

    "[The Beastie Boys] called me and said, 'We really want you andneed you on this.' I guess they felt I had a strong, articulate voice," she said.

    But, putting the election and political motivations aside for a moment, there is also Crow the breast cancer survivor, Crow the mother to 18-month-old adopted son Wyatt, and Crow the endless supporter of charities, which she'll demonstrate here this weekend.

    "It will be really, really fun -- particularly since the proceeds benefit kids," she said of her upcoming Saturday show at the Siegel Center.

    The concert is a fundraiser for the Genworth Advantage Children's Classic, and is expected to raise $500,000 for several children's charities, including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Richmond and Communities in Schools.

    While her appearance on the Get Out and Vote tour will only include a handful of songs, Saturday's show is a full Crow performance that is expected to touch on her 15 years of hits, such as "Everyday Is a Winding Road," "Strong Enough" and "All I Wanna Do."

    In addition to touring and ramping up her political activism, Crow, 46, has her first Christmas album, "Home for Christmas," available exclusively in Hallmark Gold Crown Stores. This summer, she unveiled her own eco-friendly casual clothing line, Bootheel Trading Co.

    "It's fun to be able to offer the kind of clothes I like to wear. It's inspired right out of my closet," she said of the line carried in Dillard's.

    For the month of October, 10 percent of Bootheel's apparel sales will benefit the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center.

    Crow successfully battled breast cancer in 2006 and is committed to living a healthy lifestyle.

    Anyone who caught her recent appearance on Ellen DeGeneres' talk show -- she appeared in an attractive bathing suit in preparation for getting dropped in the dunk pool for DeGeneres' monthlong cancer drive -- could see that Crow is taking care of herself.

    But is she doing anything differently?

    "Oh, Lord no!" she said with a laugh. "I continue to exercise and eat right. I either run or ride my bike, and I'm enjoying being a mom. I also have a great hair and makeup artist."

    -

    Sheryl Crow plays a benefit for the Genworth Children's Advantage Classic on Saturday, then returns to Richmond 10 days later as part of the Get Out and Vote'08 tour with the Beastie Boys, Norah Jones, Jack Johnson and Santogold.

    When: 8 p.m. Saturday at the Siegel Center for Children's Advantage Classic; 7 p.m. Oct. 28 at Richmond Coliseum for Get Out and Vote'08

    Tickets: $35-$125 for Siegel Center; $36 for Richmond Coliseum

    Info: (804) 828-7267 or www.genworth.com/children; (804) 262-8100 or www.ticketmaster.com

    Source: www.inrich.com


    [PICS] GLAMOUR REEL MOMENTS - OCTOBER 14

     

    Sheryl, Laura Dern, Rosanna Arquette and David Arquette arrive at the Glamour Reel Moments at the Directors Guild Of America on October 14, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. (Photos by Gregg DeGuire/WireImage) 


    [PICS] CNN STUDIOS - OCTOBER 13

     

    CNN Studios, Los Angeles, CA - (Photos by: Pacific Coast News)

    Tuesday October 14

    [NEWS] "GET OUT AND VOTE" TOUR DATES

    Oct 27 Charlotte, NC - Amos Southend
    Beastie Boys / Sheryl Crow / Santogold

    PRESALE Thursday, October 16th, 10a-10p local venue time
    Password: VOTE

    ON SALE Friday, October 17th, 10a Local Venue Time

    Buy Tickets


    Oct 28 Richmond, VA - Richmond Coliseum
    Beastie Boys / Sheryl Crow / Jack Johnson / Norah Jones / Santogold

    ON SALE Saturday, October 11th, 10am local venue time

    Tickets available at Richmond Coliseum and at Ticketmaster.com


    Oct 29 Youngstown, OH - Chevorlet Center
    Beastie Boys / Sheryl Crow / Ben Harper / Norah Jones

    PRESALE Thursday, October 16th, 10a-10p local venue time
    Password: VOTE

    ON SALE Friday, October 17th, 10a local venue time

    Buy Tickets


    Oct 30 Dayton, OH, Hara Arena
    Beastie Boys / Sheryl Crow / Ben Harper

    PRESALE Thursday, October 16th, 10a-10p local venue time
    Password: VOTE

    ON SALE Friday, October 17th, 10a local venue time

    Buy Tickets


    Nov 1 St. Paul, MN, Roy Wilkins Aud

    PRESALE Thursday, October 16th, 10a-10p local venue time
    Password: VOTE

    ON SALE Friday, October 17th, 10a local venue time

    Buy Tickets


    Nov 2 Milwaukee, WI - U.S. Cellular Arena
    Beastie Boys / Ben Harper / Crosby & Nash / Tenacious D

    ON SALE Saturday, October 11th, 10am local venue time

    Tickets available at U.S. Cellular Arena and at Ticketmaster.com


    [VIDEO] LARRY KING LIVE - OCTOBER 13, 2008


    [NEWS] BEASTIE BOYS, SHERYL CROW, BEN HARPER TO PLAY HARA OCTOBER 30

    DAYTON — Legendary hip-hop group The Beastie Boys and singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow will headline a concert Thursday, Oct. 30, at Hara Arena.

    Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 17, for the Get Out and Vote '08 performance, which also will include singer-songwriter-guitarist Ben Harper and other yet-to-be named acts.

    The Beastie Boys are touring selected cities in election swing states. Other performers scheduled to appear with The Beastie Boys at other shows include Jack Johnson and Norah Jones in Richmond, Va.; Tenacious D. in St. Paul, Minn.; and Crosby & Nash in Milwaukee.

    Representatives from Rock the Vote will be on hand to distribute information about local polling sites and early voting.

    General admission tickets will be $36, available at the Hara Arena box office, 1001 Shiloh Springs Road, (937) 278-4776; Ticketmaster, (937) 228-2323, or livenation.com. More information is available at www.getoutandvote08.org

    Source: www.daytondailynews.com


    LARRY KING LIVE BLOG - SHERYL CROW: TRUST IS RESTORED THROUGH SACRIFICE AND PATIENCE

    Program Note: Sheryl Crow provided us with her guest commentary. She’ll be on to discuss this and more on tonight’s Larry King Live, 9 p.m. ET.

    By Sheryl Crow
    Guest Commentary

    This will be, without a doubt, the most important election in our lifetime.

    It is with conviction that I say that we are standing, as a nation, on the precipice of real change or a continuation of the same policies that have become so familiar. We will be forced to redefine who we are as Americans, to ourselves and to the rest of the world, by who we elect to lead us in the future.

    As I watch John McCain losing his way on the path to the presidency, I am reminded of how quickly we can all lose our vision when fear steps in. I remember in 2000, when running against George W. Bush for the Republican nomination, how nasty and personal the campaign against Sen. McCain became. I recall how McCain promised he would never let his campaign become dirty but that he would instead stick to the issues. I have no doubt that John McCain is a good man but to watch him sink to the lowest form of campaigning, much in the tradition of Karl Rove’s campaign tactics of fear and insinuation, makes me feel sad for him.

    Underneath it all, I feel certain he knows he has gone in the opposite direction of who he planned on portraying himself to be, before his numbers started plummeting.

    When Martin Luther King was assassinated in 1968, Bobby Kennedy, who was campaigning for the Democratic nomination, spoke in Indianapolis. Although he was grieved over the loss of this great leader who was also his friend, he chose to keep his obligation to speak. In his address, he spoke of how easy it would be to turn the situation into anger and rioting but that this would be exactly what MLK would’ve considered to be counterproductive. He, instead, had these words to say, “In this difficult time for the United States, it’s perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in.”

    This is real leadership. This is the kind of leadership that this country has been lacking for the last eight years; leadership that inspires us; leadership that asks all of us to show up; leadership that is not based on campaigns of fear and deception as motivation but instead is based in truth and reality.

    When this presidential campaign began what feels like decades ago, the one man who seemed to transcend the rhetoric of all the other candidates was Sen. Barack Obama. His lofty ideals and inspiring calls to action resonated with all of us. However, no matter how beautiful his words, the question now is how do we find a way to trust our leadership again?

    The failing economy could be attributed to a distinct lack of risk management in the recent administration. However, as our economy has plummeted, we have seen McCain’s behavior become erratic and reactionary while Obama has continued to be methodical without rushing to judgment.

    Obama seems to be listening to all those involved and has surrounded himself with good people, while, as things worsen, McCain has become more erratic while his fan base becomes more and more angry and emotional, as displayed at recent “hate” rallies.

    It is my belief that Obama’s steadiness has separated himself from his opponent.

    Where the economy is concerned, the problems are real and difficult to understand. Because at the core of the problem exists politicians, economists, and the administration, the distrust in the American people continues to grow. The damage done can only be measured by the damage to our country’s good name in the world theatre.

    How is trust restored at home and abroad? It will require great sacrifice and patience from all of us to turn around the challenging position we are in of redefining what America stands for.

    Source: http://larrykinglive.blogs.cnn.com/2008/10/13/crow-trust-is-restored-through-sacrifice-and-patience/

    Sunday October 13

    [NEWS] SHERYL CROW: CANCER MADE ME SELFISH -IN A GOOD WAY

    By Marisa Laudadio

    Originally posted Monday October 13, 2008 04:20 PM EDT

    Sheryl Crow says breast cancer taught her a valuable lesson.

    "Breast cancer helped me put myself first in life," Crow told PEOPLE Friday before her concert for Yoplait's Save Lids to Save Lives program. "Once I stepped out of radiation, I had to remember that the only person who could take care of me was me. I'd better do that before I take care of everybody else, instead of everybody else first."

    The singer, who is now cancer-free following a lumpectomy and radiation treatments two-and-a-half years ago, says she has reached out to Christina Applegate, who underwent a double mastectomy after her own breast cancer diagnosis earlier this year.

    "I knew Christina, [so] it was less about the celebrity aspect of it and more about the experience of already having it," says Crow. "It's daunting to have to go through getting the prognosis. It's just nice to have a sounding board."

    Crow, who became a mom to 17-month-old son Wyatt and moved to a Tennessee farm after beating breast cancer, says she hopes women will be diligent about getting mammograms, learning their family history of cancer and doing self-exams.

    "I feel more connected to my life now that I've had – and beat – breast cancer," she says.

    • Reporting by SCOTT HUVER

    Source: People magazine


    [PICS] GRAMMY SOUNDCHECK AUCTION WITH SHERYL CROW

     

    [ CLICK TO ENLARGE ]

    October 10th, 2008 - Sheryl performs live for 25 students from The Long Beach Community Action Partnership at GRAMMY Foundation's GRAMMY SoundChecks program prior to her benefit concert at The Wiltern Theater, in Los Angeles. Pictures © Katy Winn/Corbis

    Sunday October 12

    [PICS] 13TH ANDRE AGASSI GRAND SLAM FOR CHILDREN - SHOW

     

    [ GO TO PHOTO GALLERY ]

    15 PHOTOS

    Pictures by Ethan Miller/Getty Images

    Set list:

    FIRST CUT (with Rod Stewart during his set)

    LEAVING LAS VEGAS
    FAVORITE MISTAKE
    ALWAYS ON YOUR SIDE
    SOAK UP THE SUN


    [PICS] 13TH ANDRE AGASSI GRAND SLAM FOR CHILDREN - RED CARPET

    Sheryl arrives at the Andre Agassi Charitable Foundation's 13th Grand Slam for Children benefit show at the Wynn Las Vegas hotel and casino Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008 in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)


    [PICS] B-SIDE

    YOPLAIT'S SAVE LIDS TO SAVE LIVES PROGRAM

    Saturday October 11

    [VIDEO] SAVING THE AMERICAN WILD HORSE - PSA FEATURING SHERYL & VIGGO MORTENSEN

    From the Documentary film Saving The American Wild Horse is a Urgent PSA featuring Sheryl Crow and Viggo Mortensen asking the American people to please call,

    - The Secretary of the Interior Dick Kempthorne (202-208-3100)
    - Director of the Bureau of Land Management Jim Caswell (202-208-3801)

    This beautiful and powerful PSA will touch the hearts and minds of all who view.

    Thank you very much for your time and concern.
    Moving Cloud Productions

    http://theamericanwildhorse.com/


    [VIDEO] SHERYL CROW & FANS FLIP THEIR LIDS TO HELP PREVENT BREAST CANCER (2008)



    [SET LIST] WILTERN THEATER, LOS ANGELES - OCT 10

    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    VEGAS
    STRONG ENOUGH
    CAN'T CRY
    MOTIVATION
    MISTAKE
    GASOLINE
    NEIGHBORHOOD
    DETOURS
    HOME
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    SOAK
    WINDING ROAD
    ****************************************
    I SHALL BELIEVE
    ALL I WANNA DO
    HIGHER GROUND


    [PICS] 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF YOPLAIT'S SAVE LIDS TO SAVE LIVES PROGRAM - ARRIVALS - OCT 10

     

    [ GO TO PHOTO GALLERY ]

    15 PHOTOS

    Photos by: Associated Press/Getty Images

    Sheryl arrives at the 10th Anniversary of Yoplait's 'Save Lids To Save Lives' Program at The Wiltern Theatre on October 10, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.


    [NEWS] CROW RESCUES WILD MUSTANG FROM EXTERMINATION

    SHERYL CROW has rescued a wild mustang from extermination and now she wants other horse lovers to do the same.

    The singer/songwriter was horrified to learn of government plans to get rid of the creatures and wants to lead by example because she thinks it's important that Americans fight to save such a valuable part of the country's history.

    She says, "There's legislation going on right now about exterminating these great wild mustangs... (They're) truly one of the great representatives of our native culture here in America.

    "Wild mustangs are really true to the heritage of this country; they help us to remember who we were.. (and) the government is trying to have them run off cliffs and things." The newest member of Crow's animal menagerie is currently being looked after by friends, while the singer tours - but she'll eventually welcome the wild horse to her ranch in Tennessee.

    Source: http://www.pr-inside.com


    [NEWS] SHERYL ON LARRY KING LIVE

    Don't miss Sheryl on Larry King Live Monday 10/13 9pm EST!

    Friday October 10

    [POSTER] GET OUT AND VOTE - OCTOBER 28, 2008


    [LIVE REVIEW] THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND FESTIVAL - SEPT 20, 2008

    "Sheryl Crow - finally, the headliner. I'd been wanting to catch Sheryl for nearly a decade. Things never clicked. Even had tickets for six years ago that I had to give up to move my brother to Chicago.

    Finally, this was going to work. She came out and KILLED the place with a solid band, a crack guitarist and a live voice that shone. She's amazing live, and she puts everything into her performances. I was bummed to see that basically Sheryl gives an 85-90 minute performance, as she's done throughout her career, but now I see why. She belts so hard that she's tired by the hour mark. Her set, however, was fantastic and I couldn't have been more pleased. Of course, I wished to have heard another ten or so tunes (including, yes, Real Gone from Cars, which is probably the one song I've listened to more in my life than any other) but was pleased as punch.

    The entire ensemble came out at the end to one-off (with an extremely scrambled vocal swapping) This Land Is Your Land. Great soloing with Crow's guitarist and Son Volt's. Also loved hearing Sarah Lee and Thomas Steinbeck (John's son and a dead ringer for him) introduce the events of the evening."

    Source: paulsrantsandraves.blogspot.com


    [VIDEOS] ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW, OCTOBER 10


    Sheryl Gets Dunked!

    Interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmb7Z9RAgaQ

    Wednesday October 8

    [INTERVIEW] YAHOO!XTRA NEWS/NZPA - OCTOBER 8

    From jingle writer to mother, Sheryl Crow has done it all
    October 8, 2008, 2:15 pm

    Multiple Grammy award winning singer song writer Sheryl Crow talks to BELINDA MCCAMMON of NZPA about her first trip to New Zealand in ten years.

    American singer Sheryl Crow has had many labels over her professional life.

    Back up singer to Michael Jackson, girlfriend (now ex) to cyclist Lance Armstrong , political activist and cancer survivor are a few.

    However, it is her latest label as a mother which is the most important and defining in Crow's life and in her music now.

    Tennesse-based Crow, 46, is set to tour New Zealand in December, alongside John Mellencamp, after last performing here in 1997. She will come armed with new material and old favourites including All I Wanna Do.

    Her son, Wyatt, whom Crow adopted last year, will accompany her on the tour -- "He goes everywhere I go" -- as will her parents, so finding a babysitter won't be an issue.

    Crow says Wyatt has influenced her life "all across the board".

    "I think your life really informs your art.

    "Because of that, every decision I make is about him and it serves to demand that I'm always open-hearted, it's a great place to write from."

    In February, Crow released her sixth studio album Detours, with material inspired by the last three years of events in her life, including her battle with breast cancer and splitting with Armstrong.

    The album has been described by Rolling Stone as Crow's most powerful and most personal record yet. For Crow longevity in an industry renowned for spitting artists out as quickly as they release albums is as rewarding as the critical and commercial success she has achieved.

    "I look back on it and think its unbelievable that I can say I was there in 1997 and I'm still going.

    "It's so unusual these days to have a long career because of how the music business is now. I feel extremely lucky. Just the fact I can go out and play my music outside of America is amazing, I feel extremely blessed."

    Crow believes her enduring popularity is because she built her fan base at a time before there was any real major television covering artists.

    "No reality TV shows, no constant tabloid coverage.

    "I actually built my fan base from word of mouth and getting out and playing. Because of that loyalty I have had a lot of longevity.

    "I also try to write music which is universal and of the moment and is truthful.

    "There is always a need for singer-song writers and I just keep going in that direction."

    Being truthful to herself and to her music has taken on new meaning since being diagnosed with breast cancer and then becoming a mother.

    "When I sat down to write the record -- and I hadn't written what I had gone through before -- I just felt an extreme sense of urgency.

    "Not only about writing from a truthful place but elephants in our living room.

    "Things so glaring that we're not talking about them.

    "For instance the urgency of our environment, the state of affairs in America and what type of country we're leaving for our kids.

    "So having breast cancer, the lessons I learned from that, about taking care of myself and writing from a place of honesty, not editing myself or worrying about what other people were thinking about me, made for a very liberating writing experience."

    Crow says she also had a three-month-old looking at her, "with this look on his face and depending on me".

    "All of those things really informed the making of this record."

    Crow is also a high profile face in the frontline in the battle against cancer and is making the best of her experience to talk and make fans aware of their own health.

    " I would have not have chosen the dubious honour which has been bestowed upon me.

    "I spent so much time in the cancer world because I was involved with probably the most famous cancer survivor [Armstrong].

    "To be diagnosed with it was really a blow and there was a lot of irony."

    Crow focuses her starpower on highlighting prevention, especially about getting mammograms.

    "I hope to be an encourager as opposed to the experience being a massive downer.

    "I came out of it and I'm cured."

    Instead of a burning desire to achieve more and be more since her clean bill of health, Crow says she hasn't set up any big goals for herself.

    There is a Christmas DVD due out next month, a first for Crow but her concentration has been on being an artist, she says.

    "Writing, socially, politically commentative songs.

    "Taking care of my son and having a real life that's based in reality as opposed to celebrity and other than that I haven't really set up any goals for myself.

    "I think that's where I get into trouble, where I wind up not being in my own life."

    It's a tough time too for all musicians in the industry.

    "Everyone is finding it difficult.

    "No one sells as many records as they used to so everyone is touring in the hope of making money."

    In America the result has been really taxing on everyone, she says.

    "When everyone is touring people can't afford to go see everyone they want to see and compound that with the price of gas and the economy -- everyone's tour is suffering.

    "It is a different time as far as music is concerned but I'm really hopeful that the whole thing will eventually and quickly implode on itself so we can get on with recreating a system."

    For now Crow's focus is on touring with Mellencamp, a relationship which she says has a real synchronicity.

    "We come from very similar musical influences and even from similar parts of the world, middle America, strong ethical people.

    "We are a good marriage and I'm enjoying playing this music and I feel like its the best album I've made."

    Sheryl Crow performs with John Mellencamp at:

    Auckland, Dec 3;
    Wellington, Dec 6;
    Christchurch, Dec 7

    Source: http://nz.news.yahoo.com

    Tuesday October 7

    HOME FOR CHRISTMAS: ALBUM PREVIEW

     


    [STORY] HOME FOR CHRISTMAS: STRING SESSION AT CAPITAL RECORDS

    http://sherylcrow.altervista.org/recensioni/hallmarkcdstringsession.html

    Source: talkmusicbiz.com


    [POSTER] RAMBLE ON THE ROAD - RYMAN AUDITORIUM, NASHVILLE - SEPT 18


    click to enlarge

    Sheryl with autoharp: so sexy!


    [LIVE PICS] VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA - OCTOBER 4

     

    [ GO TO PHOTO GALLERY ]

    21 PHOTOS

    Pictures by: Anil Sharma / Retna


    [PICS] 15TH ANNUAL WOMEN IN HOLLYWOOD

     

    [ GO TO PHOTO GALLERY ]

    15 PHOTOS

    Sheryl attend the 15th annual Women In Hollywood Tribute hosted by ELLE Magazine at the Four Seasons Hotel on October 6, 2008 in Beverly Hills, California. (Pictures by: Getty Images, Abaca Press)

    Sunday October 5

    [LIVE REVIEW] VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA - OCTOBER 4 - #4

    All she wants to do is have some fun
    By HOSEA CHEUNG, 24 HOURS

    THE BUZZ: All Sheryl Crow wanna do was have some fun, as her song goes, and the nine-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter did just that in Vancouver Saturday night with an energetic performance that saw a whole lot of clapping and dancing.

    STARTING OFF: Unplugged and mellow, the politically active Sheryl Crow began the night with a large peace logo projected behind her while singing "God Bless this Mess". Two songs later, Crow got the dance party started with "Love is Free", as fans of all ages were waving and singing along.

    DANCE, DANCE: And that seemed to be the theme of the night. From 20-year-olds to 60-plus, the crowd were on their feet for most of the evening, grooving to the upbeat poprock genre. No one was expecting a detailed choreographed set from Crow, as the 46-year-old's tremendous health clearly showed while she strutted her stuff around the stage all concert long.

    LOUDEST APPLAUSE: The cheers were thunderous when Crow's popular hits began but the most heartfelt applause had to be when the singer mentioned how she enjoys being back on stage after beating breast cancer two years ago.

    OPENING ACT: To set the tone for the night, Toronto's own Jim Cuddy entertained a tame crowd with his own style of country-rock. Although the Canadian had his moments, it was violinist Anne Lindsay, who stole the show with an intense rock-like solo that brought a roar of approval from the audience.


    STAGE SHOWING: There were no crazy props, no unnecessary visuals, and no over-used effects. The lighting was basic - nothing too fancy -, while the only complaint was by Crow herself, when she compared the vast amount of fog on stage to Vancouver's weather. All in all, it was just a simple white set with a couple lighted platforms - a very suitable feel for the down-to-earth singer and her band.

    MENTIONING BOBBY LU: Crow really brought her A-game when it came to pleasing the crowd. Besides talking about casinos and strip clubs, Crow definitely did her research on Vancouver by dedicating "Strong Enough" to one of this city's most recognized individuals, Roberto Luongo.

    OLD AND NEW: From her first album "Tuesday Night Music Club" to her latest release "Detours", Crow kept the song set diverse, mixing the old with the new and keeping her fans of all ages happy. The only complaint for this show? Well, she didn't sing "Steve McQueen".

    ROCKED THE NEIGHBORHOOD: With a powerful rendition of "There Goes the Neighborhood", Crow and her band - which includes two tall scrawny guitarists - raised the volume level and rocked the G.M. Place crowd. She even threw in a little bit of "Walk this Way" by Aerosmith. The only thing missing though was a guitar smashing.

    SONG OF THE NIGHT: It came down to two Crow classics. But in the end, the reactions from the crowd of about 9,000 gives "Soak Up the Sun" the edge over "If It Makes You Happy".

    GRADE: B-plus. It's hard to say anything bad about Crow after all her success in this industry, and especially after fans all leave with smiles on their faces. Her talented vocals and her enthusiasm produced a concert that kept her die-hards happy, satisfied, and dancing throughout the night. What more can you ask for?

    Source: Vancouver 24 hours (www.vancouver.24hrs.ca)

    PHOTO GALLERY


    [LIVE REVIEW] VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA - OCTOBER 4 - #3

    Sheryl Crow keeps it classy
    By Steve Newton

    At GM Place on Saturday, October 4

    Sheryl Crow doesn’t suffer fools—or dickheads like Karl Rove— gladly. That’s why, after getting involved in a heated exchange on global warming with George W. Bush’s former deputy chief of staff at a White House dinner last year, she became hell-bent on using her art to strike back at the world-wrecking policies of the Dubya administration.

    The result of her outrage was Detours, the politically oriented album Crow released this year, and which is currently the focus of the tour that touched down in Vancouver on Saturday.

    The 46-year-old breast-cancer survivor wasted no time getting to the point. After the house lights went down and the PA blasted out Johnny Nash’s “I Can See Clearly Now”—an Obama victory song if ever I heard one—Crow took her place in front of a black curtain bearing a huge white peace sign. She then dove right into “God Bless This Mess”, the Detours opener that lambastes Bush and his warmongering cronies.

    Then the curtain was yanked down and Crow was joined by her eight-piece band for a couple more Detours tracks before she travelled back to 1994 for “Leaving Las Vegas”, the second single off her multiplatinum debut, Tuesday Night Music Club.

    That’s basically how the concert played out for the next two hours or so, Crow interspersing breezy superhits like “Soak Up the Sun” and “If It Makes You Happy” with more serious Detours numbers inspired by skyrocketing fuel costs (“Gasoline”) and the ongoing effects of Hurricane Katrina (“Love is Free”).

    From a rockin’ standpoint, the show peaked with a couple of songs from 1998’s The Globe Sessions, “There Goes the Neighborhood” (which incorporated a smidgen of Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way”) and the funky “My Favorite Mistake”. The latter tune is widely rumoured to be about former flame Eric Clapton, but Crow’s long-time guitarist, ace stringbender Peter Stroud, didn’t inject any trademark Slowhand licks to give it away.

    Crow’s encore included her first hit, “All I Wanna Do”, which was followed by a rollicking version of Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground”. During that primo selection backup vocalists Stephanie Alexander and Nayanna Holley came out front to sing lead on one verse each, and they made potent use of their allotted time. Man, those women can wail! If they’d stolen the spotlight any longer, Crow might never have gotten it back.

    All in all, like the lady herself, Crow’s concert was a class act. The light show was ravishing and brilliantly executed, and sound engineer Sean Sullivan worked magic with the hockey rink’s questionable acoustics. My only real complaint was that, unlike every other major touring act that plays the arenas here, Crow didn’t employ the big video screens that allow everyone a decent view of the stage. It would have been nice to catch at least one close-up of that killer smile.

    Source: www.straight.com


    [BOOTLEG] THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND FESTIVAL - SEPT 20, 2008

    This Land is Your Land festival
    Sleep Train Pavilion
    Concord, California, USA
    September 20, 2008

    CD Audio - Hi-Fi Stereo
    Taper: rainingvodka
    Artwork: Aleks
    Lineage: Schoeps CMC34-> Aeta PSP3 ->R09 (@24bit 48khz) ->usb card reader->cep (fades, downsample to 16bit 44.1khz) -> cdwav -> flac frontend (lvl8)


    Tracklisting

    Disc 1

    01 God Bless this Mess
    02 Shine over Babylon
    03 Love is Free
    04 Leaving Las Vegas
    05 Strong Enough
    06 Can't Cry Anymore
    07 Motivation
    08 My Favorite Mistake
    09 Gasoline -> Gimme Shelter
    10 There goes the Neighborhood
    11 Detours

    Disc 2

    01 If it makes you Happy
    02 Out of our Heads
    03 Soak up the Sun
    04 Everyday is a Winding Road
    05 Redemption Day
    06 This Land is your Land

    All tracks use lossless FLAC, linear PCM at the standard 1411 kbps (CD Audio)


    DOWNLOAD

    Disc 1

    Tracks 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 ------------------------------ [ DOWNLOAD ] - - - (156 MB)

    Tracks 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 -----------------.-------------, [ DOWNLOAD ] - - - (174 MB)

    Disc 2

    Tracks 1 - 2 - 3 ------------------------------------------- [ DOWNLOAD ] - - - (75 MB)

    Tracks 4 - 5 - 6 --------------.----.----------------------- [ DOWNLOAD ] - - - (98 MB)


    DOWNLOAD FLAC for WINDOWS
    DOWNLOAD MacFLAC for MAC
    DOWNLOAD FLAC for Linux

    FLAC tutorial for beginners: http://www.dgmlive.com/faq-flac.htm


    ARTWORKS

    thisland1.jpg - Picamatic - upload your images

    thisland2.jpg - upload images with Picamatic 


    [LIVE REVIEW] VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA - OCTOBER 4 - #2

    Review: Plenty to crow about as Sheryl Crow plays GM Place
    Elaine Corden, Vancouver Sun
    Published: Sunday, October 05, 2008

    Even if her songs weren't undeniably catchy, it would be hard not to have a tremendous respect for Sheryl Crow. The 46-year-old singer-songwriter, who has been a bona fide rock star since the early ''90s, has more energy than artists half her age, and has in the past two years seemingly evolved into Super Woman: in 2006, she was diagnosed with breast cancer, shortly after breaking off her engagement with cycling champ Lance Armstrong - but where most might crumble from the stress, Crow has not only beaten cancer (and seemingly heartbreak), she's thrived.

    Since her diagnosis, she's adopted a son (one-year-old Wyatt, born in 2007), taken on a leading role in the 2008 presidential elections, and released a new album, Detours, earlier this year, which debuted at number two on the Billboard 200 chart.

    Oh, and she gave away 50,000 copies of the critically-acclaimed, country-tinged album to American fans in exchange for their registering to vote. Oh, and she's been on tour since July, all the while

    actively campaigning for democratic candidate Barack Obama, making public appearances at rallies and blogging about the presidential debates for the Huffington Post while she's on the road. Oh and also? She's still much, much hotter than you. Appearing at GM Place Saturday night, on the second-to-last date of the Canadian leg of her tour, Crow came out solo, as "I Can See Clearly" played her in on the stadium P.A., a ringing shorthand for the revitalized pop-star's new, focused outlook on life. The lights went up and Crow was alone onstage but for her acoustic guitar, leading off with "God Bless This Mess", her anti-George W. Bush protest number from Detours. With that done, the curtain behind her fell and her 8-piece band joined her for a nearly two-hour set of hits delivered with an undeniably fresh energy. But the time the band broke into chart-topping singalongs like "A Change Will Do You Good" and "Leaving Las Vegas", the uncommonly lean and beautiful Crow already had the audience in the palm of her hand, even getting the crowd to listen intently when she delivered political jibes during "Change..."

    To be sure, Crow took advantage of a rapt audience to further her political message, but, rather than devolving into a tiresome diatribes, her between song banter was charming and a compliment to the music - the commandingly voiced rocker can still work an arena, even when she has to sneak some serious ideological business in.

    Seeming to know what the audience had ventured out into the rainy October eve for, Crow's set was heavy on fan favourites. "Strong Enough" was a particular highlight, even if the beautifully rendered harmonies on the chorus echoed a little through the half-empty stadium.

    Though Crow has always had a knack for making cover tunes her own, the few she attempted Saturday fell a bit flat: " I Can See Clearly Now", worked into the middle of her own "I Can't Cry Anymore" showed only that the veteran songsmith is best inside her own tunes. Likewise, an interlude of Aerosmith's "Walk This Way" reminded that Crow has too many great tunes in her repertoire - "Run Baby Run" being the obvious alternative- to have to dip into Aerosmith's discography.

    In sharp contrast, Crow's newer songs showed her settling even further into a '70s rock groove. The Stones- tinged "Motivation" and the CCR-aping "Gasoline" both from Detours, showed her to be an artist at the peak of her songwriting prowess, clearly comfortable with herself and relaxed into the depth of her talents.

    If there was one complaint with the show, it was the soupy sound resulting from a venue that was barely half-full. While Crow's brand of hook-laden rock isn't out of place in a arena, if was hard not to wish she were in a smaller, more intimate space, even if that meant being packed like sardines into a 1,000-capacity venue. It might take a whole stadium to house her ambition and energy, but getting up-close-and-personal with Wonder Woman would mean audiences could see Crow as clearly as she sees herself.

    Source: Vancouver Sun (http://www.canada.com/vancouversun)


    [LIVE REVIEW] VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA - OCTOBER 4

    Sheryl Crow makes Vancouver fans happy
    Stuart Derdeyn, The Province
    Published: Sunday, October 05, 2008

    When the lights dropped and "I Can See Clearly Now" piped over the PA, you could feel the big grin on everyone's face.

    The song's line about the rain being gone was pretty funny given all the soaked umbrellas in GM Place Saturday night.

    The upbeat hit stood in stark contrast to Crow striding on stage with her big acoustic to sing out "God bless this mess."

    With a peace sign logo behind her, she sounded great and looked super healthy.

    But people didn't come for unplugged Crow. They wanted the hits driven by her big band.

    From the like seven-foot-tall lead twig, er, guitarist to the two backup singers, this was a group that could find a deeper groove live than Crow's radio-friendly studio renderings do.

    "A Change Will Do You Good" oozed with the backbeat the drummer, bassist, percussionist, rhythm guitar and organist laid down.

    People were getting their dance on so hard that there are sure to be some sore backs Sunday morning.

    "Leaving Las Vegas," "Shout," her hits just kept coming and you couldn't help.

    But appreciate the consistency of her rootsy rock.

    Her fans are dedicated and she established a solid rapport with them on topics such as gambling, boozers and strippers - and her son wanting to come to town to check them out someday.

    Huh, I thought he was, like, a baby. We all grow up.

    A lot of her lyrical themes revolve around this fact.

    Aging and changing your surrounding, your loves, your government.

    This came up quite a lot in the slick presentation; she even dedicated "Strong Enough" to Robert Luongo.

    And she spoke about how awesome it was to be back on stage after her breast cancer.

    Given the number of cheers that followed this admission, there seemed to be a lot of audience members happy to be there to see her sing for, perhaps, the same reason.

    While there is no denying that her stage banter is right out of the rock cliches 100 manual - "you're lovely" "hellooo Vancouvah," etc - she really does project a pretty folksy and friendly persona.

    At times, she seems more genuine than the music too. Case in point, the Stones-by-numbers of "I Can't Cry Anymore."

    But it's all nit-picking.

    As a colleague observed earlier in the evening Crow is like John Mellencamp and so many others; a multi-platinum selling, singles charting working person's player.

    She'll never be as good as her obvious influences but that doesn't mean it isn't a lot of fun to sing and clap along to.

    Grade: B

    Source: The Province (http://www.canada.com/theprovince)


    [SET LIST] VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA - OCTOBER 4

    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    VEGAS
    STRONG ENOUGH
    CAN'T CRY
    MOTIVATION
    MISTAKE
    GASOLINE
    NEIGHBORHOOD
    DETOURS
    RUN BABY RUN
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    SOAK
    WINDING ROAD
    ****************************************
    I SHALL BELIEVE
    ALL I WANNA DO
    HIGHER GROUND

    Saturday October 4

    [LIVE REVIEW] EDMONTON, CANADA - OCTOBER 2 - #3

    Sheryl Crow in Edmonton was one of the best concerts I've ever seen

    By Kerry Diotte - Edmonton Sun columnist

    If you get a chance to see Sheryl Crow and her band on this current tour, get to the concert!

    I took in her Edmonton, Alberta show the other night and was blown away by it. It was one of the best concerts I've seen – and I've seen a lot over the years.

    Having caught her act before when she played the very last gig of Lilith Fair in 1999 in Edmonton, I knew she was good live.

    But this recent show was sensational, in part because she played with an astoundingly tight and talented 10-piece band, including to percussionists. And this was hard rock 'n' roll sprinkled with some note-perfect ballads.

    The sound at Edmonton's Rexall Place was spot on and each and every one of her songs sounded better than the recorded versions.

    She really should put out a live album from this current tour. She and her band can rock with the best of them, even sprinkling in some of their own versions of The Stones, Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith. (Her voice is perfectly suited to cover Robert Plant's vocals.)

    Besides all that she's humourous and personable on stage – something that many rock stars can't pull off.

    I'm glad I'm not alone in thinking how good she is live these days. Critics like Mike Ross of Sun Media were also impressed.

    She richly deserves the praise.

    Source: http://blog.canoe.ca/kerry/


    [SET LIST] KELOWNA, BC, CANADA - OCTOBER 3

    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    VEGAS
    STRONG ENOUGH
    CAN'T CRY
    MOTIVATION
    MISTAKE
    GASOLINE
    NEIGHBORHOOD
    DETOURS
    HOME
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    SOAK
    WINDING ROAD
    ****************************************
    I SHALL BELIEVE
    ALL I WANNA DO
    HIGHER GROUND

    Friday October 3

    [LIVE REVIEW] EDMONTON, CANADA - OCTOBER 2 - #2

    Crow makes them happy at Rexall Place show
    Singer shows her influences and that she understands arena rock puzzle
    Tom Murray, Freelance

    SHERYL CROW
    When: Thursday night
    Where: Rexall Place

    EDMONTON - It's hard not to get sucked into the Sheryl Crow groove.

    It really is -- chalk it up to a bone-deep understanding of 1970s rock, or a limber rhythm section, but Crow really does get the arena rock puzzle, as in she understands how to work it without seeming like the caricature many other acts end up as.

    She's classic rock stuck in amber -- Stones swagger with a dab of California country-rock, some Tom Petty and John Cougar Melencamp in his heartland phase. And perfect ear candy as well. No matter where you fall on the musical spectrum, her best numbers are undeniable hip shakers.

    Where another band's hit songs may just be the tip of the iceberg -- the Stones being a good example, considering she interpolates Gimme Shelter into the middle of her own Gasoline -- Crow's best are the ones that chart. A Change Will Do You Good, If It Makes You Happy -- there's a reason why these songs outshone minor album cuts like Shine On Babylon or Love Is Free, which loped along on an easy funk groove but never really caught fire.

    The aforementioned Stones cover was flat -- edges shaved off, steely menace removed, the end-of-the-decade terror of the original turned into a crowd

    singalong. It was like the skeleton had been removed -- surprising from someone who evidently knows her musical sources. She was better with the sleazy snippet of Aerosmith's Walk This Way at the end of the show -- which points to where she really stands as an artist, as someone who comes behind a groundbreaker and codifies the music rather than opening it up.

    It feels wrong to nail Crow on her growing political awareness, but when she strays from her formula she sounds like she's forcing an opinion she may hold sincerely but can't articulate in a natural way, as though her point of reference on such matters is less Bob Dylan and more Pete Seeger at his most strident.

    Her acoustic anti-Bush number was clunky and uninspired, and as a set opener left a lot to be desired, although the crowd certainly loved it. And there was admittedly a certain amount of power in starting an arena show in such a stripped-down manner.

    In the end, though, for all the criticism that could be leveled against her, Crow put on a fine show. And if she isn't quite up to the level of her influences, there are still pleasures yet to be had in her material.

    Jim Cuddy's opening set didn't contain any surprises, but the Blue Rodeo co-leader and his fiery longtime backup band were warmly received by a crowd long used to seeing him as first on the bill at a number of Rexall shows.

    Cuddy, who also isn't exactly carving out new sonic territory with his songs either, but never claimed to, spun out 45 minutes worth of sweet country rock and even one honky-tonk burner, with the Blue Rodeo standard Five Days in July, revamped for epic guitar and fiddle solos -- a standout number.

    Source; Edmonton Journal (www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/)


    SHERYL'S BLOG: WHO IS PALIN? WE STILL DON'T KNOW

    www.huffingtonpost.com/sheryl-crow/who-is-palin-we-stilldon_b_131500.html


    [REVIEW] EDMONTON, CANADA - OCTOBER 2

    Sheryl's show shines

    By MIKE ROSS

    It sure would be a shame if Sheryl Crow goes down in the annals of pop songcraft as a promising sprinter who couldn't come through in the long run - huge hits out of the gate, great potential, writing with emotional and political substance and yet ends up doing duets with people like Kid Rock and Sting.

    What a strange career.

    Yes, it would be a shame if this was it - because she puts on a heck of a show.

    This distaff Dylan with a frivolous streak drew only 6,000 fans to Rexall Place last night. You'd think there would've been more from someone with so many Grammy awards and so many hits, albeit most of them at least a decade old, but there was no lack of love in the room. After a solo opening accompanied only by overt political content and a peace sign backdrop on God Bless This Mess, she expressed joy at being in Canada - since there seems to be some unpleasantness down in America lately - and wouldn't shut up about hockey. There's more to Canada than hockey, sister. We have another damned election coming up, too, you know.

    But like every Sheryl Crow record, we were distracted from sobering thoughts by the fun and frivolity overflowing in songs like Leaving Las Vegas, Favorite Mistake and A Change Will Do You Good (despite the latter introduced as having new meaning to tie into the American election). Along with her 1994 breakout song All I Wanna Do (Is Have Some Fun), this is the sort of artful fluff Sheryl Crow is known for, the clever constructions of pop perfection that keep generations of fans bobbing their heads and serious critics wondering if she's worth taking seriously.

    It's been hit and miss since her debut Tuesday Night Music Club, but new material shows promise. It's been a while since anyone came up with a good anti-war song - and Crow might be the one to do it. God Bless This Mess is an example of the trademark sweet melodies and folky grooves combined with political content, a track from her newest album Detours. Other fresh tunes followed - sandwiched between the comfortable pop fun of olden times - like the stomping rocker Motivation, about the new breed of celebrities famous only for being famous, and the funky, futuristic Gasoline, which is quite a fun song for how much vitriol is being poured on George W. Bush and his cronies. See? You can talk about serious things in a musical context without sacrificing a good "hook" and a good beat you can dance to.

    The performances from stage were just about flawless last night. Crow brought along two guitarists, a Hammond player, a percussionist and two back-up singers to ensure her creations were, if not studio perfect, then as close as you can get without sounding sterile. The vocals were especially excellent - powerful four- and five-part harmonies that filled out an already sweet sound.

    Just one nagging thing: She sure looked uncomfortable in high heels, teetering around the stage with her various guitars. It was like she's trying to replicate her photo on the cover of her new CD, to maintain her commercial image, to be a pop star and an activist folk singer at the same time.

    You have to wonder how great Sheryl Crow could be if she didn't worry about this sort of thing. This remains to be seen.

    It's always interesting to separate a band's component parts to see which one has the most talent. Just as Fleetwood Mac without Lindsey Buckingham turns into just another average hippie blues band, Jim Cuddy without Blue Rodeo - who opened the show last night - becomes just another average country rock singer.

    You want proof? The most exciting moments of a set larded with lazily arranged, mid-tempo tedium were the two Blue Rodeo tunes. For the most part, Cuddy's solo material is weak. Meanwhile, partner Greg Keelor's solo stuff tends to be weird. Who knows how this chemistry comes about to create pop perfection like Five Days in May?

    Stay together is all I can say.

    But it's hard to hate this smiling cosmic cowboy no matter how many times he's played here. He smiled through his major key happy songs, he smiled through the poignant ballads, he smiled as he likewise wouldn't shut up about hockey, he smiled as he hurled a rhetorical lyrical twist at George W. Bush in a song called One Fine Day, as in "one fine day we're gonna watch you fall." (Ouch, says Bush.)

    Good move for an opening act for this particular headliner, even though, as Jim's mom says, it's just "piling on" at this point.

    ---

    SOUNDCHECK
    MAIN EVENT

    Sheryl Crow

    IN THE SEATS
    6,000 in Rexall

    NOTE PERFECT

    Fun and frivolity and political content mixed together with pop perfection.

    RATING
    4 1/2 out of 5

    Source: www.edmontonsun.com


    [NEWS] ECO-NOTE FROM A BLOGGER

    Quick note:
    I just wanted to say how impressed I was with the fact the Sheryl Crow used stainless steal water canteens at her concert this week instead of plastic bottles. In fact her entire band was using them and I only saw one plastic cup, which I'm okay with because it looked like it was a rye & coke, which we all know is so good that it's above any Living Green initiatives.

    Source: http://www.mikesbloggityblog.com/2008/10/sheryls-smart-move.html

    Concert review (+pics) >>


    [SET LIST] EDMONTON, CANADA - OCTOBER 2

    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    VEGAS
    STRONG ENOUGH
    CAN'T CRY
    MOTIVATION
    MISTAKE
    GASOLINE
    NEIGHBORHOOD
    DETOURS
    IT'S ONLY LOVE
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    SOAK
    WINDING ROAD
    ****************************************
    I SHALL BELIEVE
    ALL I WANNA DO
    ROCK N ROLL


    [MAGAZINE] STAR MAGAZINE, SEPT 29 ISSUE

    Sheryl and Wyatt. Democratic National Convention - soundcheck


    [PIC] BEING A JACKASS

    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2008/9/29/145243/136/752/614527

    Thursday October 2

    [SET LIST] CALGARY, CANADA - OCTOBER 1

    Sheryl Crow soaks up 'Dome
    Rootsy songbird treats crowd to hits, politics
    Heath McCoy, Calgary Herald
    Published: Thursday, October 02, 2008

    Sheryl Crow Wednesday night at the Pengrowth Saddledome.

    Attendance: 8,000

    Sheryl Crow stood alone in the spotlight Wednesday night at the Saddledome, strumming her acoustic guitar as she sang her new anti-George W. Bush screed God Bless This Mess.

    A giant peace sign hovered above her head, hung on the black curtain behind her.

    When the curtain dropped, 46-year-old Crow and her band swung into the country-tinged rock of the new tune Shine Over Babylon, not one of her best songs, though she sung it with plenty of rootsy soul power.

    She followed this up with another new one, the groovy folk-funk of Love Is Free, which does rate with her best work.

    It seemed to be pretty well-received, too. Though, of course, the biggest cheers were reserved for Crow's biggest hits.

    Leaving Las Vegas was winning with its lazy, sexy rhythms, and Strong Enough came off as a compelling folk lullaby.

    The catchy A Change Would Do You Good was delivered fairly solidly as well, though the sound mix seemed a bit muddled.

    Here, Crow, whose music has become pointedly political in recent years, used the song as a jab at the U.S. Republican party.

    "This song about change is really hitting home for us right now," she said, adding hastily that Sarah Palin (the Republican candidate for vice-president in the current presidential race) is not the change folks are looking for.

    Overall, the concert had its share of impressive moments, but it also had plenty of lulls. And there were few instances that could really qualify as outstanding.

    The key to Sheryl Crow's enduring success is that she hearkens back to another era entirely -- an era that produced many an enduring tune.

    She's highly reminiscent of that golden age of soft rock in the '70s. The Eagles, Linda Ronstadt, Stevie Nicks, James Taylor, Carly Simon -- that's the sort of sunbaked, radio-ready folk-pop that Crow has long gravitated toward, and she's shown a genuine knack for crafting dead-catchy hits.

    The problem is, she's seldom lived up to the artists who have inspired her.

    When she's strived for the heights of true giants like Joni Mitchell and the Rolling Stones, she hasn't even come close.

    She seemed to make this point herself mid-show with her version of the Stones' Gimme Shelter, which was rendered professionally enough, but with none of the original's mean edge.

    Back to those dead-catchy hits of hers though, at press time, she and the band were running through an excellent version of one of her finest on the Stones-lite If It Makes You Happy, which was a highlight of the night.

    Opening for Crow was Jim Cuddy, the sweet side of Blue Rodeo, whose solo band warmed up the crowd of 8,000 in style with a smoking set of folk-rockin' honky tonks.

    Cuddy's usually best when accompanied by his crusty Blue Rodeo foil Greg Keelor, but his 'Dome performance Wednesday night really was superb on the part of both him and his fantastic, fiery roots band.

    hmccoy@theherald.canwest.com

    Source: Calgary Herald (www.canada.com/calgaryherald)


    HELLO MY FRIEND HELLO

    Ahr!


    [SET LIST] CALGARY, CANADA - OCTOBER 1

    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    VEGAS
    STRONG ENOUGH
    CAN'T CRY
    MOTIVATION
    MISTAKE
    GASOLINE
    NEIGHBORHOOD
    DETOURS
    IT'S ONLY LOVE
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    SOAK
    WINDING ROAD
    ------------------------
    I SHALL BELIEVE
    ALL I WANNA GO
    HIGHER GROUND

    Wednesday September 30

    [LIVE REVIEW] SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN - SEPTEMBER 29 - #2

    Crow brings personality, politics to stage
    Stephanie Classen, The StarPhoenix
    Published: Tuesday, September 30, 2008

    Sheryl Crow has an opinion and she's not afraid to share it. But what could be preachy and unlikable in the wrong hands, the rocker manages to say with charm, wit, a measure of humour and expert showmanship.

    On Monday night at Credit Union Centre, the 46-year-old musician took to a stage accented by a curtain lit with a massive peace sign. With only an amplified acoustic guitar and her voice, Crow broke into God Bless This Mess, a song critical of U.S. President George W. Bush.

    Throughout the performance it was clear America was on Crow's mind. In the midst of an economic crisis and preparing for a presidential election, the country seems in need of a change. Crow, an obvious Democrat, said her song A Change Would Do You Good would be a "great election song."

    But Crow wasn't only about the political agenda, she also proved why her sound is worthy of nine Grammys. Even though the show was set in an arena, she did her best to make the plastic chairs and concrete walls feel as intimate as a smoke-filled bar gig. Her sultry,

    worn-in speaking voice added some down-to-Earth banter to the music. Dressed in a pair of tight black pants tucked into knee-high boots, the svelte Crow exuded happy energy and pranced around the stage, poking fun at her dancing ability.

    As a musician, Crow is unlike any other female in her genre. Despite some high-profile publicity, including a recent bout with breast cancer and a public link to Lance Armstrong, fame and success don't appear to have coloured her sweet yet smart personality. Her genuine love of performing and unassuming style make her instantly loveable.

    Switching between acoustic and electric guitar, Crow is every bit the rock star, without the pompous attitude. Not to mention she can do things with her singing voice you'd never expect based on her stripped-down CDs.

    The first three songs of the night, including Love is Free and Shine Over Babylon, were a trio from Crow's latest album, Detours, but she also managed to squeeze in an array of favourites, including Leaving Las Vegas, Can't Cry, If it Makes You Happy, Soak Up the Sun and My Favorite Mistake. A performance of Strong Enough, illuminated by flickering white light from a pair of disco balls, was a slide-guitar-infused highlight. Her encore included All I Wanna Do and a super sexy version of Led Zeppelin's Rock 'n' Roll.

    Backed by an eight-piece band, part of which was elevated on platforms that wouldn't look out of place on the set of a 1950s talk show, Crow traded the giant screens in for an elaborate lighting scheme that illuminated the stage with mood-appropriate colours.

    Opening for Crow was The Jim Cuddy Band, who complemented the evening like a well-worn pair of jeans: Familiar and just the right fit. Everything, from Cuddy's laid-back style to his unassuming chatting with the crowd suited the headliner.

    Cuddy and his four-member band focused on his solo work for most of his nine-song set, but a extended version of Five Days in May prompted the most applause and left the violinist with more than a few broken bow strings.

    sclassen@sp.canwest.com

    Source: The Star Phoenix


    [LIVE TALES] "THE HORROR, THE HORROR..."

    I've read one story after another on the 'Net. Seems like this type of behavior is sharply on the rise:

    All they wanted to do was have some fun at Crow concert - LETTER - COMMENT ON LETTER

    I attended the Sheryl Crow concert on Sept. 24 and was very excited about my front-row seats.

    After waiting at least 20 minutes to get a beer, I anxiously waited for the concert to begin.

    Sheryl Crow and her band came on stage, so I decided to take a picture. A few seconds later, I was tapped on the shoulder and told "no cameras" by a security guard. I figured I spent $80 on a ticket so I had a right to take some pictures if I wanted. The press was able to take as many as they wanted.

    Then a song came on that needed a bit of dancing, so I got up and started swaying to the music. I was again tapped on the shoulder, this time by another concertgoer, who told me to sit down.'

    This took me aback. I paid $80 for front-row seats and now I'm not allowed to dance?

    If people don't want to dance, they shouldn't get front-row seats at a rock concert.

    I obliged the gentleman and went back to my seat.

    Then, in a middle row, a guy who maybe had a little too much to drink but was having a great time, was taken away by security. This made me a little angry as he also had paid his money to attend the concert. He was standing and telling Sheryl that he loved her -- does that mean he should be kicked out of the venue? Was he really hurting anyone?

    What happened to the days of going to a concert and having a good time?

    Now it's sit in your seat, don't take any pictures, don't get too crazy, and definitely do not dance.

    Sheryl Crow put on an awesome show. Too bad I couldn't enjoy it as much as I wanted to.

    Lindsay Metcalfe,
    Rushmere Drive

    Source: www.saultstar.com

    Oh... i almost forgot:

    And all the concertgoers shake their asses...

    ;-)


    [LIVE REVIEW] SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN - SEPTEMBER 29



    GOD BLESS
    BABYLON
    LOVE IS FREE
    CHANGE
    VEGAS
    STRONG ENOUGH
    CAN'T CRY
    MOTIVATION
    MISTAKE
    GASOLINE
    NEIGHBORHOOD
    DETOURS
    RIVERWIDE
    HAPPY
    OUT OF OUR HEADS
    SOAK
    WINDING ROAD
    ****************************************
    I SHALL BELIEVE
    ALL I WANNA DO
    ROCK AND ROLL


    [LIVE REVIEW] REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN - SEPTEMBER 29

    Crow opens up to fans in Regina
    Erin Harde, for the Leader-Post
    Published: Monday, September 29, 2008

    REGINA -- With peace signs a plenty, images of John Lennon, messages of political change and songs about listening to the heart, Sheryl Crow and her eight-piece band staged a love-in at the Brandt Centre Sunday night.

    Reginans caught their first glimpse of Crow during "God Bless This Mess," an open criticism of the Bush administration. Alone at centre stage in front a curtain with a giant flowered peace sign, Crow strummed a guitar that encompassed most of her diminutive frame. Her voice, on the other hand, filled every nook and cranny of the near-capacity arena.

    As the curtain fell away to reveal sleek silver platforms topped with musicians, Crow showed off her pipes during "Shine Over Babylon." By the time she started "Love is Free," the third song in a row from her new album Detours, the party was in full swing with the platform lights bathing the venue in a warm glow. From the two drummers to the backup singers, each musician was in constant motion, seemingly enjoying each moment as much as the audience.

    There were no costume changes or choreography to overshadow the mass of talent Crow had assembled for the tour. For a pop superstar, Crow herself dressed modestly in black leggings, a black top, sparkly studded belt and black high heels.

    Music ruled over cheap gimmicks through all 19 songs, a steady hit parade from Crow's early hits to recent singles.

    "I'm gonna play old songs since I've never met you before," she said before playing "Can't Cry Anymore" from 1993's Tuesday Night Music Club. Introducing "A Change Would Do You Good," Crow made subtle remarks about the American election, but in the end let her music speak for her

    ."It's just good to get out of the house and turn off the news, right?" she asked. "It's a bad state of affairs. That's why I like to speak about change."

    Halfway through "Leaving Las Vegas," she polled the crowd on whether they liked to drink, strip or gamble.

    "So I'm playing for drinkers," she decided, before belting out the chorus, which hinged on shrill at times, but was still a rush to hear live. Taking the show back to current material, she introduced "Motivation" by asking fans if they read the tabloids. Not hearing a response, the 46-year-old Missouri native laughed and told the crowd she was moving to Canada, not the first time she praised the country.

    During "Strong Enough" Crow, who's had infamous relationships with Eric Clapton and Lance Armstrong, pondered looking for a man in Canada.

    She also talked about her "scrumdiddlyumptious" son Wyatt, and about having beaten breast cancer.

    "Don't make me come out there and spank you," she teased the women in the crowd, prodding them to be diligent about breast exams and mammograms. Crow explained that her cancer and all the "crazy things" that had recently happened in her personal life inspired Detours. During the song, glow-in-the-dark stars and a moon turned the stage from rocking party into a child's bedroom as Crow exposed her vulnerable side.

    The rest of the night, she assumed wide-legged, open-armed power stances, appropriate for the guitar god cover songs she took on including the Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter," which morphed smooth as butter from the apocalypse-tinged "Gasoline." She also worked Aerosmith's "Walk this Way" into "There Goes the Neighborhood," and offered Led Zeppelin's "Rock and Roll" as the final number of the night. It may have been the one song with vocals she couldn't handle, but the rest of her choices, including "If It Makes You Happy," "My Favourite Mistake," and "Every Day is a Winding Road," all showcased her formidable talent.

    Even overplayed radio songs like "Soak Up the Sun" and "All I Wanna Do" were injected with new life in the live format, but Crow's set peaked with "Out of Our Heads." A throwback to the protest songs of the '60s, the song captured the peace-loving spirit of the evening as videos of Lennon and Martin Luther King Jr. looked down upon a happy, dancing crowd.

    Had Crow not even taken the stage Sunday night, fans would nearly have gotten their money's worth from opening act The Jim Cuddy Band, which played music from Cuddy's solo catalogue including "All I Need" and the gorgeous "Pull Me Through," along with Blue Rodeo songs. During "Five Days in May," Cuddy handed the spotlight to violinist Anne Lindsay who briefly stole the show, playing so quickly one could imagine smoke rising from the bow.

    Cuddy didn't shy away from politics either, saying "One Fine Day," was openly critical of Bush, which drew cheers from the crowd.

    Source: Regina Leader Post (www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/index.html)


    [LIVE REVIEW] WINNIPEG, MANITOPA- SEPTEMBER 27

    Concert Review: Sheryl Crow At MTS Centre, Winnipeg, MB, 09/27/2008
    Written by Triniman
    Published September 29, 2008

    Around 9 pm, the lights went down inside the MTS Centre, Winnipeg's main concert venue, and taped music of Johnny Nash's "I Can See Clearly Now" was played for a few minutes before the headliners took to the stage. I had an excellent view from the third row on the floor and some of the people around erupted in excitement as they spotted the band members climb the stairs to the stage, from the side, partly obscured by the curtains.

    Suddenly, there was someone with long, curly blond hair walking on and with the stage still in darkness, Sheryl Crow (46) strapped on an acoustic guitar and began playing a bitter-sweet slow number that referenced 9/11 and the lies that led to the war in Iraq. It was "God Bless This Mess," from her new album, Detours. A giant peace symbol was projected on the curtains for maximum effect, in case you didn't get what the song was about or what helped inspire some of the new disc.

    After that number, the curtains fell down and revealed the backing band, which was comprised of a percussionist with a drum kit, a drummer, a bassist, a lead guitarist, a mandolin/ acoustic guitarist, a keyboard player, and two back-up singers. They were tight and sounded good. Crow mistakenly mentioned that it was Friday night and had tomorrow as a bonus. She asked the audience whether or not she had played Winnipeg before. She joked that they were nodding yes but saying no.In fact, she played a rural festival in 1996.

    She spoke about watching the debate between the two Presidential candidates yesterday, on their day off, and moaned about how messed up the US was as a result of Bush. She then played another new song, "Shine Over Babylon." Crow supports the US Democratic party. She performed at their convention this summer and in 2007, she famously got into a heated exchange with Republican brain trust Karl Rove at the White House's annual Correspondent's Dinner, over global warming.

    Before introducing another new song, she also mentioned how she was engaged and then not, was diagnosed with breast cancer, but beat it. Crow asked the audience if they read the tabloids and wondered why people were famous for being famous and mentioned quickly Paris Hilton before breaking into "Motivation," another new song.

    There was also a green bent to one of her songs, an apocalyptic tune from the future about the long past year 2017 and the gasoline crisis, called "Gasoline." Crow is quite the political, social, and environmental activist, sort of like a female Bono. She plans on donating $1 from every ticket sold on the 2008 tour to the United Nations World Food Programme. The audience wanted to hear her best-known songs and they were not disappointed with "The First Cut Is The Deepest," "Leaving Las Vegas," "If It Makes You Happy," "Everyday Is A Winding Road," "A Change Would Do You Good," and "Soak Up The Sun." "All I Wanna Do" and Led Zeppelin's "Rock And Roll" were saved for the encore.

    Curiously, she utilized snippets of a couple of songs in the show. "Gimmie Shelter" by the Rolling Stones crept into "Gasoline," Aerosmith's "Walk This Way" and early in the show, Johnny Nash's 1972 hit, "I Can See Clearly Now," which she made into a sing-along.

    Sheryl Crow flashes her pearly whites an awful lot, and she smiles and sings a great deal. Bob Dylan doesn't smile when he sings. Crow is the master of it. Her vocals were always spot on. Whether she sang in whispered "come hither" tones or from the bottom of lungs in the rockier tunes, her voiced seemed to be beautiful and flawless.

    This was the second time that I've seen Blue Rodeo front man Jim Cuddy open for someone at the MTS Centre. The last time he opened, it was for John Forgerty in 2007.

    Cuddy is an excellent singer and storyteller. He looks sincere and passionate, unlike the cold, distant Oasis singer, Liam Gallagher. Some of the songs they played were good, but some were forgettable sound-alikes. Cuddy's weakness lies not in his singing, stage presence, strength of his or the band's musicianship, or his lyrics. The weakness lies with the sameness of the songs. He and his band make for a good opening act, but I wouldn't go out of my way to see them headline. The highlight of his show was when the band played extended songs and did some jamming. His fiddle player, Anne Lindsay, put on a volcanic performance that brought considerable applause when she was finished.

    Attendence was 6000 and my rating for this show is 3.5/5.

    Source: http://blogcritics.org/


    .